rathole:

Planning ahead. #cinefex

I hope someone makes more Cinefex slipcases soon — I’m going to run out!

rathole:

Planning ahead. #cinefex

I hope someone makes more Cinefex slipcases soon — I’m going to run out!

movieposteroftheday:

US one sheet for LOGAN’S RUN (Michael Anderson, USA, 1976)
Artist: Charles Moll [see also]
Poster source: Heritage Auctions
Read more about Logan’s Run and its posters in an archived Movie Poster of the Week from 2011.

movieposteroftheday:

US one sheet for LOGAN’S RUN (Michael Anderson, USA, 1976)

Artist: Charles Moll [see also]

Poster source: Heritage Auctions

Read more about Logan’s Run and its posters in an archived Movie Poster of the Week from 2011.

Here’s a supercut of all of the shots of the time circuits from the three Back to the Future movies. The only date that’s still in the future is October 21, 2015 — and not the 2014 that was circulating a few days ago. We still have a year to make hover boards, self-lacing shoes, self-drying jackets, flying cars, and a crapload of holographic Jaws sequels.

Source: youtube.com

artofthetitle:

The Wizard of Oz was released 75 years ago this week.

“There’s no place like home!”

Watch The Wizard of Oz sequence on Art of the Title

Auntie Em!!

Art of VFX interviews Scott Squires:

Few weeks ago, the 2014 edition of Imaging the Future was held in Neuchatel, Switzerland. On this occasion, I met the VFX legend Scott Squires and ask him some questions about his impressive career.

In my interview, Scott Squires talks about Dream Quest Images and ILM but also about the cloud tank effect and Commotion.

Source: artofvfx.com

the-mamishka:


solarbird:

Scarecrow Video has been a Seattle institution for many years. It started as a video rental store – and still is one – but it was owned by the kind of crazed film fanatics who run a business primarily as a way to build the biggest collection of things imaginable. The original owner was the sort of person who would fly on an hour’s notice to former Soviet republics on the rumour that he could get a SECAM videotape copy of a particular obscure Stalinist-era Belorussian film. And half the time, he’d return with it.
Despite having one of the largest film collections in the world – possibly the largest in the world – video rental doesn’t cut it anymore, so they’re going non-profit. But that’s expensive, too, so they’re launching a Kickstarter to make it happen. Go help.
I started renting from them when they were next to J&S Phonograph Needles in Roosevelt – yes that was a store for phonograph needles it didn’t make much sense them either – and remember when they moved to the U. District, on 50th and Roosevelt. They bought out what used to be the biggest Radio Shack ever, a multistory building with its own screening lounge and everything.
It’s pretty damn cool, and it’d be a disaster to lose such a comprehensive film collection – particularly as it is actually available to the public. Even the exotic stuff can be rented and/or screened – they have multiformat players available, too. In some cases, they have one of only three to four copies of films still in existence, and you can see it. That’s the kind of collection this is.
I’ve known one of the current owners for a long time; this project is a big deal for them, too. So go help them flip that switch to non-profit. As I write this, they’ve made 60% of goal in a day, thanks in no small part to The Onion‘s AV Club. Let’s see if we can’t get them there by tomorrow, eh?
Mirrored from Crime and the Blog of Evil. Come check out our music!

Wow. I was just going to write a post about this myself, having just learned about the Kickstarter the other day, but now I don’t have to because Solarbird has said it all! 
For the record, I have been a long time employee of Scarecrow Video and it is the most amazing place for movies there is. It should be a historic landmark in Seattle! Let’s help keep it alive and kicking!!

the-mamishka:

solarbird:

Scarecrow Video has been a Seattle institution for many years. It started as a video rental store – and still is one – but it was owned by the kind of crazed film fanatics who run a business primarily as a way to build the biggest collection of things imaginable. The original owner was the sort of person who would fly on an hour’s notice to former Soviet republics on the rumour that he could get a SECAM videotape copy of a particular obscure Stalinist-era Belorussian film. And half the time, he’d return with it.

Despite having one of the largest film collections in the world – possibly the largest in the world – video rental doesn’t cut it anymore, so they’re going non-profit. But that’s expensive, too, so they’re launching a Kickstarter to make it happen. Go help.

I started renting from them when they were next to J&S Phonograph Needles in Roosevelt – yes that was a store for phonograph needles it didn’t make much sense them either – and remember when they moved to the U. District, on 50th and Roosevelt. They bought out what used to be the biggest Radio Shack ever, a multistory building with its own screening lounge and everything.

It’s pretty damn cool, and it’d be a disaster to lose such a comprehensive film collection – particularly as it is actually available to the public. Even the exotic stuff can be rented and/or screened – they have multiformat players available, too. In some cases, they have one of only three to four copies of films still in existence, and you can see it. That’s the kind of collection this is.

I’ve known one of the current owners for a long time; this project is a big deal for them, too. So go help them flip that switch to non-profit. As I write this, they’ve made 60% of goal in a day, thanks in no small part to The Onion‘s AV Club. Let’s see if we can’t get them there by tomorrow, eh?

Mirrored from Crime and the Blog of Evil. Come check out our music!

Wow. I was just going to write a post about this myself, having just learned about the Kickstarter the other day, but now I don’t have to because Solarbird has said it all! 

For the record, I have been a long time employee of Scarecrow Video and it is the most amazing place for movies there is. It should be a historic landmark in Seattle! Let’s help keep it alive and kicking!!


"I don’t want to film a ‘slice of life’ because people can get that at home, in the street, or even in front of the movie theater. They don’t have to pay money to see a slice of life. And I avoid out-and-out fantasy because people should be able to identify with the characters. Making a film means, first of all, to tell a story. That story can be an improbable one, but it should never be banal. It must be dramatic and human. What is drama, after all, but life with the dull bits cut out. The next factor is the technique of film-making, and in this connection I am against virtuosity for its own sake. Technique should enrich the action. One doesn’t set the camera at a certain angle just because the cameraman happens to be enthusiastic about that spot. The only thing that matters is whether the installation of the camera at a given angle is going to give the scene its maximum impact. The beauty of the image and movement, the rhythm and the effects—everything must be subordinate to the purpose."
Alfred HitchcockAugust 13, 1899 — April 29, 1980


I know there wasn’t a lot of VFX in Hitchcock’s films, but what little there was served his stories incredibly well. Have you watched North by Northwest lately?

"I don’t want to film a ‘slice of life’ because people can get that at home, in the street, or even in front of the movie theater. They don’t have to pay money to see a slice of life. And I avoid out-and-out fantasy because people should be able to identify with the characters. Making a film means, first of all, to tell a story. That story can be an improbable one, but it should never be banal. It must be dramatic and human. What is drama, after all, but life with the dull bits cut out. The next factor is the technique of film-making, and in this connection I am against virtuosity for its own sake. Technique should enrich the action. One doesn’t set the camera at a certain angle just because the cameraman happens to be enthusiastic about that spot. The only thing that matters is whether the installation of the camera at a given angle is going to give the scene its maximum impact. The beauty of the image and movement, the rhythm and the effects—everything must be subordinate to the purpose."

Alfred Hitchcock
August 13, 1899 — April 29, 1980

I know there wasn’t a lot of VFX in Hitchcock’s films, but what little there was served his stories incredibly well. Have you watched North by Northwest lately?

Source: strangewood