Return to Tomorrow: The Filming of Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Brought to my attention by Daren Dochterman (who we interviewed in Episode 001 about his work on the Director’s Cut), there is a new book available for pre-order that chronicles an oral history of the making of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. In Daren’s words:

To all my friends who consider “Star Trek: The Motion Picture” to be a classic, and to all those who think it ranks behind Trek V as a form of entertainment… This is a fascinating tale decades in the making… featuring interviews done back in the day… the untold story of how the “Franchise” was won… and opened the door to a worldwide phenomenon. Here is the story, by the people who did it… in their own words. Painstakingly researched and edited… it’s a must have for Die Hard Trek fans and fans of moviemaking in general. You need this… BADLY!

Limited to 1,000 copies, this Creature Feature exclusive is available for pre-order now, and will ship in October.

If you enjoyed our Raiders of the Lost Ark discussion in Episode 006A, check out more about the effects of Raiders of the Lost Ark at TheRaider.net:

Although there are four shots in the finished film that make use of cel animation to achieve ghosts and ghost effects, the bulk of the material was shot using other techniques including miniatures in the tank and full-scale puppets and actors. Special optical techniques were developed to combine the ghosts with live action footage giving a transparent “look” that would not look like a simple double exposure or “burn-in.”

Also pictured here: Alan Maley with his matte painting seen behind the jeep that drove off the cliff during the truck chase, building the three heads destroyed in the final Ark sequence, and the actual China Clipper filmed, with the corresponding matte painting that made it look like it could really take off!

These images, and a lot more to see and read in Chapter 6: Concluding the Adventure of The Making of Raiders of the Lost Ark on excellent fan site TheRaider.net.

Just half an hour left to contribute to our Season 2 fundraiser — can you help push us over our $500 goal?

Go now: https://www.booster.com/opticalpodcast

UPDATE:

The fundraiser was a success! Thanks to everyone who contributed, and who spread the word. You all rock. I can’t wait to start on Season 2!

Just half an hour left to contribute to our Season 2 fundraiser — can you help push us over our $500 goal?

Go now: https://www.booster.com/opticalpodcast

UPDATE:

The fundraiser was a success! Thanks to everyone who contributed, and who spread the word. You all rock. I can’t wait to start on Season 2!

k4nine:

Jean-Marc Rochette’s SNOWPIERCER illustrations

Source: k4nine

Dark Majesty: Dean Semler, ASC, ACS, enters the realm of an evil icon with Maleficent. in American Cinematographer

[Dean] Semler found [director Robert] Stromberg meticulously prepared for the complexities of combining the live-action photography with extensive visual effects, the latter of which were supervised by Carey Villegas. “The moment I walked into Rob’s ‘War Room,’ there was the whole movie covering the office walls in 36-by-18-inch prints of conceptual drawings and storyboards,” he recalls. “I was thrilled — the clarity of Rob’s vision made it easy for everyone, especially me!

“The depiction of light was exciting,” Semler continues, “the way the huge castle windows were single-light sources, how the walls receded into moody shadows, the importance of fire and candlelight, how the exterior sets could be brought to life with backlight. When I timed the film many months later with Yvan Lucas at EFilm, those images on the office wall were alive on the screen.”

And you can read more about the VFX of Maleficent in Joe Fordham’s article in the new Cinefex issue 138, out now.

Source: theasc.com

The Visual Effects of Snowpiercer

I saw Snowpiercer last week, here in Seattle, and it’s quite a ride — no pun intended. The VFX were impeccable. Graham Edwards has a conversation with VFX supervisor Eric Durst.

Episode 006B is out!

We interview sound designer Mark Mangini about his career, including his early work on Raiders of the Lost Ark, and chat with film/TV editor Brian Newell about Dragonslayer, and the invention of Go-Motion.

See the full show notes and download links here.

This is continuing coverage of Cinefex 6 — see episode 006A for even more Raiders and Dragonslayer goodness!

Listen for your chance to win a free 1-year print subscription to Cinefex magazine.

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T-shirt fundraiser

Help fund The Optical’s second season, and buy a T-shirt for our fundraising campaign! — only six days left to contribute!

Episode 006B is out!

We interview sound designer Mark Mangini about his career, including his early work on Raiders of the Lost Ark, and chat with film/TV editor Brian Newell about Dragonslayer, and the invention of Go-Motion.

See the full show notes and download links here.

This is continuing coverage of Cinefex 6 — see episode 006A for even more Raiders and Dragonslayer goodness!

Listen for your chance to win a free 1-year print subscription to Cinefex magazine.

Subscribe to the Podcast

Direct Downloads

T-shirt fundraiser

Help fund The Optical’s second season, and buy a T-shirt for our fundraising campaign! — only six days left to contribute!

Raiders of the Lost Ark - Story Conference

Later today you’ll get Episode 006B, continuing our coverage of Raiders of the Lost Ark and Dragonslayer, but in the meantime, check out this PDF transcript of the original story conference where George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, and Larry Kasdan sat around for a couple of intense days, tossing around ideas, and forming the future of what would becomes the Indiana Jones trilogy. (I say trilogy because I don’t think any of the major ideas here bled over into Crystal Skull, though they certainly did into Temple of Doom and Last Crusade.)

And then, this evening, you’ll get 006B, featuring my full interview with fascinating sound designer Mark Mangini (who started his film career on Raiders), and a discussion of the new Go-Motion animation technique created for Dragonslayer. See you then!

plink-does-stuff:

magnificenttitanic:

Many people mistake that certain piece of wood for a door. Some people know it’s not a door, but don’t know what it actually is. This should clear things up.

A++++ to the art department’s researchers on this one because I don’t want to believe that to be a fluke.

I’d guess it would be someone working under Production Designer Peter Lamont. Anyone know?