notpulpcovers:

1949-Motion Picture Daily http://flic.kr/p/nh4mtt

Mighty Joe Young!

You can hear Cinefex publisher Don Shay and I talk about Mighty Joe Young, and several other Willis O’Brien movies, on The Optical podcast Episode 007!

notpulpcovers:

1949-Motion Picture Daily http://flic.kr/p/nh4mtt

Mighty Joe Young!

You can hear Cinefex publisher Don Shay and I talk about Mighty Joe Young, and several other Willis O’Brien movies, on The Optical podcast Episode 007!

soundonsight:

‘The Art of John Alvin’ Book Review

Drew Struzan might be the name you first think of when someone mentions movie poster artist, but few can argue that the work of John Alvin is not a equally iconic. Alvin’s art has be collected in great effort into one tight package in The Art of John Alvin by his wife Andrea Alvin. The high quality coffee table book collects the late artist’s film poster art in their final form and in the earliest stages when he was just starting to figure out the layouts for some of the posters that would go on to be some of the most iconic of all time.

Click here to expand the article 

postatomichorror:


Post Atomic Horror episode 192, covering Accession and Rules of Engagement is available now. Click!


Our good friends AAl and Matt from Episode 001 are still cranking out their great Star Trek podcast, the Post Atomic Horror. I highly encourage you to give them a listen!

postatomichorror:

Post Atomic Horror episode 192, covering Accession and Rules of Engagement is available now. Click!

Our good friends AAl and Matt from Episode 001 are still cranking out their great Star Trek podcast, the Post Atomic Horror. I highly encourage you to give them a listen!

Mix contributor Larry Blake examines the topic of immersive sound for cinema and its three formats: Auro-3D Audio, Dolby Atmos, and DTS, in the September 2014 issue of Mix

I you enjoyed our talk with sound designer Make Mangini in Episode 006B, check out this look at the technology behind the latest cinema surround formats. > The introduction in 2005 of the Digital Cinema Initiatives standard brought with it the largest wholesale change in motion picture presentation since the arrival of widescreen cinema and stereophonic sound in 1953. It differed greatly from the past because picture and sound specifications had already been carefully vetted by committees with an eye toward scalability of the DCPs (Digital Cinema Packages) that are sent to theaters. For the image, this meant 2k resolution was the minimum, but 4k was supported; in sound, all theaters were expected to have basic 5.1 systems, although the standard allowed for a total of 14 channels. Two additional channels are reserved for mono mixes for hearing impaired and visually impaired patrons, the latter being narration on top of the mix. However, it was inevitable that variations would soon occur, and these were first in picture with various implementations of 3-D. As soon as this was starting to sort itself out in 2012, two different immersive sound formats arrived to break the 7.1 barrier that was the limit for almost all previous DCPs. First, in January 2012 Auro Technologies, in association with Barco Cinema, introduced Auro-3D with the film Red Tails in Auro 11.1, which was shown in about 2 theaters in the U.S. The development of Auro-3D began seven years prior, with research that CEO Wilfried Van Baelen had done at his Galaxy Studios in Belgium. The Auro-3D cinema format, in its basic 11.1 cinema iteration, adds a 5.0 height layer—three screen speakers and two upper surround channels—above the standard 5.1 system—plus a top layer comprising a center-ceiling “Voice of God” channel. The system can be expanded to 13.1 with the splitting of the lower surrounds into four channels, as in 7.1. Utilizing their proprietary Auro Codec, the additional tracks are encoded in the four least significant bits of a standard 24-bit, 48kHz mix, so that only one 5.1 or 7.1 printmaster needs to be shipped on DCPs, with the additional height and top channels decoded in the cinema. Auro Technologies has a complete suite of plug-ins to aid mixers, including the Auro-Panner, to place sounds in the 3-D field, and Auro-Matic Pro, which allows upmixing of mono, stereo and 5.1 elements to their 11.1 and 13.1 formats. The second “salvo” in the new format wars occurred in June 2012 when Dolby Laboratories introduced its Atmos format for the Pixar animated film Brave on 14 screens. Dolby had been researching expanding cinema speakers for years, going back to 2002 and We Were Soldiers, which utilized an overhead VOG channel.

vimeo:

Terry Gilliam, the man who brought us Brazil, returns to his surreal futuristic side with Zero Theorem.

Buy it or rent it on Vimeo On Demand

I’ve been waiting to see this one for quite a while. Can’t wait to see the VFX too!

Source: vimeo

How we made Back to the Future | Film | The Guardian

Bob Gale:

The first preview went brilliantly, though there was some nervousness when Einstein the dog disappeared during the time travelling – everyone thought we’d killed him. The studio head was so excited about the film he asked if we could bring the release forward from mid-August 1985 to early July. He’d give us whatever it would take to make that happen. Nine and a half weeks after we’d wrapped, it was in cinemas. We ruined post-production schedules for ever: everyone would be told, “Those Back to the Future guys did it fast; why can’t you?”

How we made Back to the Future | Film | The Guardian

Bob Gale:

The first preview went brilliantly, though there was some nervousness when Einstein the dog disappeared during the time travelling – everyone thought we’d killed him. The studio head was so excited about the film he asked if we could bring the release forward from mid-August 1985 to early July. He’d give us whatever it would take to make that happen. Nine and a half weeks after we’d wrapped, it was in cinemas. We ruined post-production schedules for ever: everyone would be told, “Those Back to the Future guys did it fast; why can’t you?”