How we made Back to the Future | Film | The Guardian

Bob Gale:

The first preview went brilliantly, though there was some nervousness when Einstein the dog disappeared during the time travelling – everyone thought we’d killed him. The studio head was so excited about the film he asked if we could bring the release forward from mid-August 1985 to early July. He’d give us whatever it would take to make that happen. Nine and a half weeks after we’d wrapped, it was in cinemas. We ruined post-production schedules for ever: everyone would be told, “Those Back to the Future guys did it fast; why can’t you?”

How we made Back to the Future | Film | The Guardian

Bob Gale:

The first preview went brilliantly, though there was some nervousness when Einstein the dog disappeared during the time travelling – everyone thought we’d killed him. The studio head was so excited about the film he asked if we could bring the release forward from mid-August 1985 to early July. He’d give us whatever it would take to make that happen. Nine and a half weeks after we’d wrapped, it was in cinemas. We ruined post-production schedules for ever: everyone would be told, “Those Back to the Future guys did it fast; why can’t you?”

September 1, 1902 — Georges Méliès’ A Trip to the Moon premieres in France.

Watch the full restored hand-colorized version on Hulu

Source: strangewood

Guardians of a Colourful Galaxy - Cinefex Blog

Great piece on spaceship livery by Graham Edwards, on the Cinefex Blog:


  Stanley Kubrick has a lot to answer for. Single-handedly, he took all the fun out of space travel. All the fun, and all the colour
  
  Ever since the release of Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1968, spaceships in the movies have been painted white. Or grey. Or black. Ooh, is that a hint of silver? It’s the NASA look, defined in the sixties by the Apollo missions with their black-and-white Saturn V rockets, and inherited in the eighties by the equally monochromatic Space Shuttle.
  
  Meanwhile, the list goes on. Pick any iconic spaceship of the last forty years, then consider the paint job. The Nostromo? Light grey. The Sulaco? Dark grey. Then there’s the Rodger Young from Starship Troopers, or the Battlestar Galactica, or the Prometheus …
  
  You get the picture.
  
  Now everything has changed. Thanks to James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy, space travel just went Technicolor.

Guardians of a Colourful Galaxy - Cinefex Blog

Great piece on spaceship livery by Graham Edwards, on the Cinefex Blog:

Stanley Kubrick has a lot to answer for. Single-handedly, he took all the fun out of space travel. All the fun, and all the colour

Ever since the release of Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey in 1968, spaceships in the movies have been painted white. Or grey. Or black. Ooh, is that a hint of silver? It’s the NASA look, defined in the sixties by the Apollo missions with their black-and-white Saturn V rockets, and inherited in the eighties by the equally monochromatic Space Shuttle.

Meanwhile, the list goes on. Pick any iconic spaceship of the last forty years, then consider the paint job. The Nostromo? Light grey. The Sulaco? Dark grey. Then there’s the Rodger Young from Starship Troopers, or the Battlestar Galactica, or the Prometheus

You get the picture.

Now everything has changed. Thanks to James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy, space travel just went Technicolor.

Source: cinefex.com

Above: Colored spots indicate where subjects looked during an action sequence from Iron Man 2.  Marvel Studios (Iron Man 2) / Tobii Technology (eye tracking data)

How Movies Manipulate Your Brain to Keep You Entertained | Science | WIRED


  For viewers, it’s quintessential, over-the-top Hollywood action. For scientists, it’s a window into the human brain. At a recent event here hosted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, neuroscientists and cognitive psychologists got together with filmmakers to discuss what both groups have learned—the scientists through painstaking experiments and analysis, the filmmakers by intuition and experience—about the mechanisms of attention and perception.
  
  Jon Favreau, who directed Iron Man 2, was onstage with [Tim Smith, a vision scientist at the University of London] as he presented the clip, and seemed fascinated by it. “Everything you’re looking at is real, and everything you’re not looking at is fake,” he said.
  
  The scene was shot in a parking lot in Downey, outside L.A., Favreau said. The boats in the harbor were created with CGI, as were the crowds in the stands along the race course.
  
  “We’re constantly calculating where we think the audience’s eye is going to be, and how to attract it to that area and prioritize within a shot what you can fake,” Favreau said. “The best visual effects tool is the brains of the audience,” he said. “They will stitch things together so they make sense.”


AMPAS posted a full write-up of the event, with video highlights on their website, including the second night of the event, during which they pitted four frame rates (24, 48, 60, and 120 fps) against each other to see how our brains process the information differently.

Read the above story and more Cinema Science stories on Wired.

Above: Colored spots indicate where subjects looked during an action sequence from Iron Man 2. Marvel Studios (Iron Man 2) / Tobii Technology (eye tracking data)

How Movies Manipulate Your Brain to Keep You Entertained | Science | WIRED

For viewers, it’s quintessential, over-the-top Hollywood action. For scientists, it’s a window into the human brain. At a recent event here hosted by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, neuroscientists and cognitive psychologists got together with filmmakers to discuss what both groups have learned—the scientists through painstaking experiments and analysis, the filmmakers by intuition and experience—about the mechanisms of attention and perception.

Jon Favreau, who directed Iron Man 2, was onstage with [Tim Smith, a vision scientist at the University of London] as he presented the clip, and seemed fascinated by it. “Everything you’re looking at is real, and everything you’re not looking at is fake,” he said.

The scene was shot in a parking lot in Downey, outside L.A., Favreau said. The boats in the harbor were created with CGI, as were the crowds in the stands along the race course.

“We’re constantly calculating where we think the audience’s eye is going to be, and how to attract it to that area and prioritize within a shot what you can fake,” Favreau said. “The best visual effects tool is the brains of the audience,” he said. “They will stitch things together so they make sense.”

AMPAS posted a full write-up of the event, with video highlights on their website, including the second night of the event, during which they pitted four frame rates (24, 48, 60, and 120 fps) against each other to see how our brains process the information differently.

Read the above story and more Cinema Science stories on Wired.

Source: Wired

This year marks the 30th anniversary of Ghostbusters, and it’s being re-released into theaters this weekend! To celebrate, we’ve collected a bevy of links about the making of the classic comedy.

In the video above, Richard Edlund talks about making the terror dogs for Ghostbusters, on an episode of Hollywood FX Masters. In addition to stop-motion, there were also articulated full-size puppets controlled by several on-set operators. (If you want to learn more about stop motion animation, check out The Optical Episode 007, out now!)

More Ghostbusters goodness:

Way back in episode 001, we talked with Daren Dochterman about his involvement in the Star Trek fan series, Phase II, but there’s a complimentary series being produced by another group, called Star Trek Continues that also has impressively high production values. Take a look behind the scenes, at the painstakingly recreated Enterprise set:

Wired: Beam Me Up Scotty! Tour the USS Enterprise used in Star Trek Continues w/Vic Mignogna

From the transporter room to the sick bay, take a full tour of the stage used in Star Trek Continues. Modeled after the original set used in the late ’60s, Vic Mignogna takes us behind the painstakingly recreated USS Enterprise.

Source: youtube.com

Episode 007 is out!

We chat with creator and publisher of Cinefex, Don Shay, about the life and work of stop motion pioneer Willis O’Brien, including The Lost World, King Kong, Mighty Joe Young, and more. We also interview animation director Rob Shaw about his films and experience as a stop-motion animator.

See the full show notes and download links here.

Listen for your chance to win a free 1-year print subscription to Cinefex magazine.

Subscribe to the Podcast

Subscribe in iTunes
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MP3 podcast feed

Episode 007 is out!

We chat with creator and publisher of Cinefex, Don Shay, about the life and work of stop motion pioneer Willis O’Brien, including The Lost World, King Kong, Mighty Joe Young, and more. We also interview animation director Rob Shaw about his films and experience as a stop-motion animator.

See the full show notes and download links here.

Listen for your chance to win a free 1-year print subscription to Cinefex magazine.

Subscribe to the Podcast

postatomichorror:

Star Trek: Axanar {x}

Fan-fucking-tastic.

Prelude to Axanar

Yes, it’s a Star Trek fan film, but the modest documentary-style presentation allows for top-notch acting (with actors who have been in official Trek productions), makeup, and VFX on a budget. Definitely something to check out.

Source: almostsleepy

Dream Landscapes - The Mountain on the Cinefex Blog:


  Mountains stand tall in the history of cinema too: monumental examples of Werner Herzog’s idealised “dream landscape”, and guardians of a lethal realm in which spectacle and peril are balanced precariously over the abyss.
  
  But consider the challenge of elevating an entire film crew – not to mention a cast of fragile actors – to the top of a remote and snowbound peak. Little wonder the art of visual effects has played such a large part in putting these high sierras on the screen.


I love seeing the various ways that mountains have been portrayed in film, but the most iconic for me, like Joe Fordham comments, is Devils Tower in Wyoming.



My family and I moved across the country from Maryland to Seattle last year, and we tried to stop at a few movie locations along the way, including the cemetery used in Night of the Living Dead, and Mount Rushmore (from North by Northwest, naturally), but the one place that I wanted to visit more than any other was Devils Tower.

The day we made it to Devils Tower, we had been driving across South Dakota on I-90 all day — just miles and miles and miles of wide open desert and prairie. Beautiful country, I am sure, but after four days of driving across the country, I was hypnotized by the monotony of it. As we approached the Black Hills, however, the road started to curve and undulate as the rolling hills rose up around the highway. We entered that small corner of Wyoming, the hills were a little bit steeper, but my sense of anticipation was positively mountainous.



Suddenly seeing it come into view, as we came around a bend in the road, was an incredible experience. I’d been transfixed by this geological feature as part of one of my most beloved movies since I was a small child, and finally seeing it in front of me — it was hard to accept that it was real. It looks completely out of character with the rest of the landscape around it, and I can understand why Joe Alves recognized its alien qualities as the perfect match for Close Encounters’ extra-terrestrial elements.



We spent the rest of the early evening there, until the museum closed, looking at the history and the folklore surrounding the site, including a delightful painting depicting the Cheyenne legend of a giant bear that clawed the sides of the mountain, creating its trademark gouges. Of course, the real reason for its distinctive surfacing is because of the mostly hexagonal crystal structure of the phonolite porphyry columns, but understanding the science behind the formation makes it no less magical.



We took a long walk around the base of the Tower as the sun started to set, taking in its various facets. It was a thrilling experience, and one I’d love to repeat sometime. There were miniature models of it used in Close Encounters, to be sure, but rare is the moment when you can see something you were so sure was merely movie magic directly in front of you in the real world. It’s definitely something to experience, if you can.

What’s your favorite movie mountain?

Dream Landscapes - The Mountain on the Cinefex Blog:

Mountains stand tall in the history of cinema too: monumental examples of Werner Herzog’s idealised “dream landscape”, and guardians of a lethal realm in which spectacle and peril are balanced precariously over the abyss.

But consider the challenge of elevating an entire film crew – not to mention a cast of fragile actors – to the top of a remote and snowbound peak. Little wonder the art of visual effects has played such a large part in putting these high sierras on the screen.

I love seeing the various ways that mountains have been portrayed in film, but the most iconic for me, like Joe Fordham comments, is Devils Tower in Wyoming.

My family and I moved across the country from Maryland to Seattle last year, and we tried to stop at a few movie locations along the way, including the cemetery used in Night of the Living Dead, and Mount Rushmore (from North by Northwest, naturally), but the one place that I wanted to visit more than any other was Devils Tower.

The day we made it to Devils Tower, we had been driving across South Dakota on I-90 all day — just miles and miles and miles of wide open desert and prairie. Beautiful country, I am sure, but after four days of driving across the country, I was hypnotized by the monotony of it. As we approached the Black Hills, however, the road started to curve and undulate as the rolling hills rose up around the highway. We entered that small corner of Wyoming, the hills were a little bit steeper, but my sense of anticipation was positively mountainous.

Suddenly seeing it come into view, as we came around a bend in the road, was an incredible experience. I’d been transfixed by this geological feature as part of one of my most beloved movies since I was a small child, and finally seeing it in front of me — it was hard to accept that it was real. It looks completely out of character with the rest of the landscape around it, and I can understand why Joe Alves recognized its alien qualities as the perfect match for Close Encounters’ extra-terrestrial elements.

Painting of Cheyenne story by Herbert Collins 1936

We spent the rest of the early evening there, until the museum closed, looking at the history and the folklore surrounding the site, including a delightful painting depicting the Cheyenne legend of a giant bear that clawed the sides of the mountain, creating its trademark gouges. Of course, the real reason for its distinctive surfacing is because of the mostly hexagonal crystal structure of the phonolite porphyry columns, but understanding the science behind the formation makes it no less magical.

We took a long walk around the base of the Tower as the sun started to set, taking in its various facets. It was a thrilling experience, and one I’d love to repeat sometime. There were miniature models of it used in Close Encounters, to be sure, but rare is the moment when you can see something you were so sure was merely movie magic directly in front of you in the real world. It’s definitely something to experience, if you can.

What’s your favorite movie mountain?

Source: cinefex.com

rathole:

Planning ahead. #cinefex

I hope someone makes more Cinefex slipcases soon — I’m going to run out!

rathole:

Planning ahead. #cinefex

I hope someone makes more Cinefex slipcases soon — I’m going to run out!